Showing posts tagged rape.
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baubles of my mind's eye

Rape Pervasive in Agricultural Industry (Infographic)

univisionnews:

image

Scene from the PBS documentary “Rape in the Fields.”

By JORGE RIVAS

For the more than half a million women who pick and handle the food we eat, sexual assault often comes comes with the job. 

Frontline partnered with Univision News to produce the documentary “Rape in the Fields” that explores how many migrant women working in America’s fields and packing plants are sexually assaulted by supervisors who exploit their immigrant status. 

Read More

(Source: thisisfusion, via sinidentidades)

— 1 year ago with 610 notes

#food justice  #feminism  #misogyny  #violence against women  #sexual harassment  #rape  #workers rights  #vegetarian  #vegan 

shallowxgraves:

Remember the “rape crew” in Ohio that everyone was so mad about for like a week?
Where there was fucking photographic and video evidence of the survivor being raped, and the rapists live tweeted it, and still the cops haven’t done a fucking thing?

THATS NOT AN ISOLATED INCIDENT.
THATS HOW LITTLE THE COPS CARE ABOUT RAPE.

So yeah, you don’t get to be shocked when survivors don’t want to go to the cops, and you don’t get to say that’s what they ought to do. 

(Source: manicpixiedreamgh0ul, via olaflecoq)

— 1 year ago with 277 notes

#rape  #cops  #police  #rape culture 
thepeoplesrecord:

Women’s incarceration rate soars by 600%+ as they face abuseDecember 26, 2012
Allowing male guards to oversee female prisoners is a recipe for trouble, says former political prisoner Laura Whitehorn. Now a frequent lecturer on incarceration policies and social justice, Whitehorn describes a culture in which women are stripped of their power on the most basic level. “Having male guards sends a message that female prisoners have no right to defend their bodies,” she begins. “Putting women under men in authority makes the power imbalance as stark as it can be, and results in long-lasting repercussions post- release.”
Abuse, of course, can take many forms, from the flagrant - outright rape, groping, invasive pat-downs and peeping during showers or while an inmate is on the toilet - to verbal taunts or harassing comments. And while advocates for the incarcerated have long tried to draw attention to these conditions, they’ve made little to no headway. But that may be changing thanks to the promulgation of rules, finalized in June, to stem the overt sexual abuse of prisoners. The nine-years-in-the-making Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) is the first law in US history to address the sexual abuse of those in lock-up, and its passage made clear that the sexual abuse of the incarcerated - men and women - is a pervasive problem in prisons throughout the 50 states. But let’s hold off on PREA for a minute and first zero in on the reality of female incarceration more generally.
According to  The Sentencing Project, between 1980 and 2010, the number of incarcerated women ballooned by 646 percent, from 15,118 to 112,797; most were convicted of nonviolent offenses. Add in females who are incarcerated in local jails and the number increases to approximately 205,000. In addition, more than 712,000 women are presently on probation, and another more than 103,000 are on parole.
Prisoners’ rights activists note that, more often than not, these women enter the criminal justice system with long histories of domestic and other abuse. Indeed, a  2007 study by The American Civil Liberties Union found that 92 percent of California’s female prisoners had been abused in some way prior to being taken into custody.
 The Center for Child and Family Studies at the University of South Carolina corroborates this finding and notes that many teenage girls experienced their first arrest shortly after fleeing abusive homes. “What may be remarkable within this sample is the cumulative impact of cumulative victimization over the life span,” CCFS researchers report. “Many of the women suffered multiple traumas. They were victimized in multiple ways - child abuse and neglect, adult relationship violence, sexual violence, not to mention the number of times they experienced each type of victimization.” The Center calls it “poly-victimization” and cites women’s efforts to stop aggression or retaliate against an aggressor as a key reason many are behind bars. The researchers also note that a history of sexual abuse typically leads to other problems, including unplanned pregnancies, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, low self-esteem, depression and addiction - issues that can make incarceration exceptionally difficult.
Whitehorn acknowledges that many of the women she was jailed with, or has come to know since her release, were abused, and says that the daily pat-down searches that take place in federal prison sometimes cause flashbacks for those who’ve been molested; many subsequently become easy prey for exploitative guards and administrators, the result of a learned acquiescence to predatory behavior.
At the same time, she says, sex between staff and inmates happens, and when it occurs, it raises the ante of unequal power even further. “Even when it’s quote ‘consensual,’ for a prisoner to consent to sex with her ‘boss’ is troubling, especially since a refusal can be considered a refusal to obey a direct order,” Whitehorn continues. “The woman can lose her job or be thrown in the hole [an isolation cell] for saying ‘No,’ and even if her job pays pennies, it allows her to buy toothpaste and other necessities.”
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Women’s incarceration rate soars by 600%+ as they face abuse
December 26, 2012

Allowing male guards to oversee female prisoners is a recipe for trouble, says former political prisoner Laura Whitehorn. Now a frequent lecturer on incarceration policies and social justice, Whitehorn describes a culture in which women are stripped of their power on the most basic level. “Having male guards sends a message that female prisoners have no right to defend their bodies,” she begins. “Putting women under men in authority makes the power imbalance as stark as it can be, and results in long-lasting repercussions post- release.”

Abuse, of course, can take many forms, from the flagrant - outright rape, groping, invasive pat-downs and peeping during showers or while an inmate is on the toilet - to verbal taunts or harassing comments. And while advocates for the incarcerated have long tried to draw attention to these conditions, they’ve made little to no headway. But that may be changing thanks to the promulgation of rules, finalized in June, to stem the overt sexual abuse of prisoners. The nine-years-in-the-making Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) is the first law in US history to address the sexual abuse of those in lock-up, and its passage made clear that the sexual abuse of the incarcerated - men and women - is a pervasive problem in prisons throughout the 50 states. But let’s hold off on PREA for a minute and first zero in on the reality of female incarceration more generally.

According to  The Sentencing Project, between 1980 and 2010, the number of incarcerated women ballooned by 646 percent, from 15,118 to 112,797; most were convicted of nonviolent offenses. Add in females who are incarcerated in local jails and the number increases to approximately 205,000. In addition, more than 712,000 women are presently on probation, and another more than 103,000 are on parole.

Prisoners’ rights activists note that, more often than not, these women enter the criminal justice system with long histories of domestic and other abuse. Indeed, a  2007 study by The American Civil Liberties Union found that 92 percent of California’s female prisoners had been abused in some way prior to being taken into custody.

 The Center for Child and Family Studies at the University of South Carolina corroborates this finding and notes that many teenage girls experienced their first arrest shortly after fleeing abusive homes. “What may be remarkable within this sample is the cumulative impact of cumulative victimization over the life span,” CCFS researchers report. “Many of the women suffered multiple traumas. They were victimized in multiple ways - child abuse and neglect, adult relationship violence, sexual violence, not to mention the number of times they experienced each type of victimization.” The Center calls it “poly-victimization” and cites women’s efforts to stop aggression or retaliate against an aggressor as a key reason many are behind bars. The researchers also note that a history of sexual abuse typically leads to other problems, including unplanned pregnancies, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, low self-esteem, depression and addiction - issues that can make incarceration exceptionally difficult.

Whitehorn acknowledges that many of the women she was jailed with, or has come to know since her release, were abused, and says that the daily pat-down searches that take place in federal prison sometimes cause flashbacks for those who’ve been molested; many subsequently become easy prey for exploitative guards and administrators, the result of a learned acquiescence to predatory behavior.

At the same time, she says, sex between staff and inmates happens, and when it occurs, it raises the ante of unequal power even further. “Even when it’s quote ‘consensual,’ for a prisoner to consent to sex with her ‘boss’ is troubling, especially since a refusal can be considered a refusal to obey a direct order,” Whitehorn continues. “The woman can lose her job or be thrown in the hole [an isolation cell] for saying ‘No,’ and even if her job pays pennies, it allows her to buy toothpaste and other necessities.”

Source

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via socio-logic)

— 1 year ago with 854 notes

#abuse  #feminism  #rape  #prison  #violence  #queue 

diesoapscum:

Literally like the only way most men can think of a woman as a person who shouldn’t be raped and abused is by thinking of her as “someone’s daughter”, “someone’s wife”, “someone’s sister”, etc. They can’t just think of her as a woman unto herself who SHOULD NOT BE RAPED WHETHER OR NOT SHE IS A SINGLE ORPHANED ONLY CHILD, that would be weird. She must belong or be connected to someone in some way in order to be a person worthy of respect.

(via gotochelm)

— 1 year ago with 6070 notes

#rape culture  #misandry  #rape  #what if it happened to your mother?  #what if it happened to your sister?  #feminism 
thatsucia:

ineffableshe:





kvltkunt:






total retribution.  
if you live in williamsburg/bushwick and feel in danger or are just pissed about being assaulted, harassed or bashed let us know.  email at brassknucklewitches@gmail.com or call us at 347.68.SLICE
PLEASE REBLOG!!!!!!!!






okay, this is rly cool but i rly wish that this was also written in spanish. bushwick is a primarily latino district, most of the white residents are gentrifiers. if you walk thru bushwick, you will see informational fliers about housing & whatnot written by community residents & for residents in spanish, why not also use the language of the community? who exactly is the target audience of an english-only flyer // who exactly are we trying to protect??? 
other than that, this is totally awesome though.





HI EVERYONE, I’VE PROVIDED A SPANISH TRANSLATION (thanks to my old high-school Spanish dictionary lol) LET ME KNOW IF THIS MAKES SENSE BECAUSE MY GRAMMAR IS A LIL’ RUSTY.
VICTIMAS DE VIOLENCIA SEXUAL NO RECIBEN NADA PERO CULPO. 
Se les culpa de lo que llevan puesto, o lo hermoso o feo que son. QUE CARAJO.
Somos un grupo armado de mujeres y homosexuales que han tenido bastante de la violación y no confiamos en los hombres para protegernos. Podemos hacerlo nosotros mismos. Tenemos armas y estamos muy bien vestido.
La policía no ayudamos, y no queremos su ayuda. La violación se debe a que el sistema que defienden.
Las mujeres, los homosexuales, los transexuales, trabajadoras sexuales, ¡uníos! Llámenos a cualquier hora del día, si usted necesita nuestra ayuda. ¡Sí se puede!
Email a brassknucklewitches@gmail.com
o llámenos al (347) 687-5423

thatsucia:

ineffableshe:

kvltkunt:

total retribution.  

if you live in williamsburg/bushwick and feel in danger or are just pissed about being assaulted, harassed or bashed let us know.  email at brassknucklewitches@gmail.com or call us at 347.68.SLICE

PLEASE REBLOG!!!!!!!!

okay, this is rly cool but i rly wish that this was also written in spanish. bushwick is a primarily latino district, most of the white residents are gentrifiers. if you walk thru bushwick, you will see informational fliers about housing & whatnot written by community residents & for residents in spanish, why not also use the language of the community? who exactly is the target audience of an english-only flyer // who exactly are we trying to protect??? 

other than that, this is totally awesome though.

HI EVERYONE, I’VE PROVIDED A SPANISH TRANSLATION (thanks to my old high-school Spanish dictionary lol) LET ME KNOW IF THIS MAKES SENSE BECAUSE MY GRAMMAR IS A LIL’ RUSTY.

VICTIMAS DE VIOLENCIA SEXUAL NO RECIBEN NADA PERO CULPO. 

Se les culpa de lo que llevan puesto, o lo hermoso o feo que son. QUE CARAJO.

Somos un grupo armado de mujeres y homosexuales que han tenido bastante de la violación y no confiamos en los hombres para protegernos. Podemos hacerlo nosotros mismos. Tenemos armas y estamos muy bien vestido.

La policía no ayudamos, y no queremos su ayuda. La violación se debe a que el sistema que defienden.

Las mujeres, los homosexuales, los transexuales, trabajadoras sexuales, ¡uníos! Llámenos a cualquier hora del día, si usted necesita nuestra ayuda. ¡Sí se puede!

Email a brassknucklewitches@gmail.com

o llámenos al (347) 687-5423

(via brujacore)

— 1 year ago with 2759 notes

#feminism  #brooklyn  #rape  #sexual violence  #Latin@  #en español 
"When somebody says, “I don’t think women should be raped for wearing short skirts, but what do they expect when they do go out like that?” what you are actually saying is that if a woman in a short skirt is raped, you will be less likely to hold her rapist culpable. Which makes a woman in a short skirt really appealing to a rapist. That’s something that you did. That’s not something the woman in the short skirt did, or something the rapist did. You made that woman a more comfortable target by making it clear that if she got raped, you would be less upset about it, less willing to see the rapist go to jail, less willing to support the woman."
— 1 year ago with 2969 notes

#feminist  #feminism  #rape  #rape culture  #victim blaming  #slut shaming  #important quotes 
Beware Amica Insurance TW: rape and CSA

face-down-asgard-up:

sparkleflaca:

so, i posted about my extremely terrible bad service with Amica life insurance in the livejournal community bad_service a few days ago. i did not include any identifying characteristics about myself, save for my medical info and the fact that I was rejected for life insurance.

Amica, using their official twitter account commented on the entry, essentially calling me a liar, and saying they would report me to LJ abuse. very professional, no?

i’m just disgusted and violated and creeped out. how did they even find the post, and how did they figure out who was the one posting it? i don’t understand.

please reblog this to bring attention to Amica’s despicable and unprofessional practices. thanks.

the original bad service post: http://bad-service.livejournal.com/3104297.html

amica’s comment: http://bad-service.livejournal.com/3104297.html?thread=99864361#t99864361

This shit is 100% unacceptable. Read the posts linked above and spread the word please.

(via katelucia)

— 1 year ago with 424 notes

#insurance  #rape  #abuse  #consumer beware  #amica  #Amica Life Insurance  #bad businesses 
[tw: rape culture] I really don’t get it

wretchedoftheearth:

fromonesurvivortoanother:

women have at least a 25% chance of being raped by men

but people are offended when we distrust men and try to protect ourselves

are you serious?

I have much lower odds of swimming in a pool during a storm and being struck by lightning but I still don’t do that

I have much lower odds of dying in a car crash but I still put on my seatbelt

I have much lower odds of being attacked by a shark but I still listen to life guard warnings

I have much lower odds of being in a plane hijacking but I still want the TSA to exist

I have much lower odds of dying in an earthquake but i still want there to be emergency protocols and fireproofing and retrofitting

I have much lower odds of dying to gun violence but I still don’t like guns and I still prefer safeties

I have much lower odds of catching some horrible infectious disease i still get vaccinated

and yet you are angry at me for being concerned about a 25% chance of being assaulted and violated

what the fuck is wrong with you

oh my god this is such a good way of putting this, thank you.

(via all-about-male-privilege)

— 1 year ago with 7800 notes

#rape culture  #rape  #tw: rape  #important 

queenofadodi:

Men had no problem violating women’s bodies while they had on corsets, petticoats and farthingales, so what the fuck makes you think a short skirt has anything to do with it? 

(Source: morenamagia, via katelucia)

— 1 year ago with 324043 notes

#truth  #tw: rape  #rape  #rape culture  #victim-blaming 
"There are only two types of men who are upset that they need permission before they can have sex: rapists and potential rapists."
— 1 year ago with 11796 notes

#consent  #bodily autonomy  #sexuality  #sex  #healthy sexuality  #TW  #rape 
Rationality via Verbal Brutality: [TW: rape] Don't believe in rape culture? Here are some statistics for you. →

feminist-space:

wretchedoftheearth:

Out of every 100 rapes:

  • 46 are reported to the police
  • 12 rapes will resort in an arrest
  • 9 rape cases are prosecuted
  • 5 rape cases lead to a felony conviction
  • Only 3 rapists will ever spend a day in jail

In a survey of 11-14 year-old boys:

  • 51% believed rape was acceptable if a boy spent a lot of money on a girl
  • 31% believed rape was acceptable  if a girl had past sexual experience
  • 65% believed rape were acceptable if a girl and boy had been dating for more than 6 months
  • 87% believed rape were acceptable if the woman and man are married

A woman might not even have grown up understanding what rape is…because in a survey of 11-14 year-old girls:

  • 41% believed rape was acceptable if a boy spent a lot of money on a girl
  • 32% believed rape was acceptable  if a girl had past sexual experience
  • 47% believed rape were acceptable if a girl and boy had been dating for more than 6 months
  • 79% believed rape were acceptable if the woman and man are married

In a survey of college males:

  • 35% admit - anonymously - that they would rape under the circumstances that they could get away with it
  • 1 in 12 admitted to committing acts defined as rape, but 84% of rapists did not recognize those acts as rape
In yet another survey of college males:
  • 43% of college-aged men admitted to using coercive behavior to have sex, including ignoring a woman’s protest, using physical aggression, and forcing intercourse.
  • 15% acknowledged they had committed acquaintance rape; 11% acknowledged using physical restraints to force a woman to have sex.
[x] [x] [x] I could go on, but attitudinal surveys and acceptance of rape myths are far more telling than legal statistics.

Source: wretchedoftheearth

(via stfusexists)

— 1 year ago with 20353 notes

#rape  #violence  #crime  #rape culture 
face-down-asgard-up:

madamethursday:

[Image: A shoulders-up portrait of prosecutor Kym Worth, a beautiful, magnificent Black woman wearing a dark gray suit with a shit shirt and a white multi-tiered necklace, facing the camera.]
bankuei:

blackheartedlove:

aerialcircus:
Rapists, Beware: Detroit Prosecutor IDs 21 Attackers in ‘Rape Kit’ Investigation

“Kym Worthy has identified 21 serial rapists so far in a sweeping investigation that could have national implications. Abigail Pesta reports on the crusade to eliminate the rape-kit backlog.
Twenty-one serial rapists have been identified in a massive investigation led by Detroit prosecutor Kym Worthy—and her manhunt has only just begun.”


This is what I mean when I say it takes a society to keep fucked up shit rolling.   At the point when the police are sitting on 11,000 untested rape kits, with NO INTENTION of ever doing so, you basically are saying, “rape is a crime we’re not going to investigate”.
Y’ALL STAY ON GIVING SPEEDING TICKETS, BUT RAPE IS A CRIME YOU’RE NOT GOING TO INVESTIGATE.
The fact that in the first 150 kits, they’ve already found 21 serial rapists’ DNA.  Basically, a) no one investigates, b) no one prosecutes, c) no one cares.   We’ve got Homeland Security ready to swoop up and detain someone, indefinitely, if they said the wrong shit, but no one has time or money for rape victims.
Don’t ever let anyone say “the police aren’t all bad” because the article even lists SEVERAL CITIES that have backlogs like this, as well.   This isn’t a local outlier- this is a common problem, which means the whole policing system doesn’t fucking care.  And where are these good police out in checking their own departments and pushing to see this change?


can i just reblog this again for that spot-on commentary? YES.

face-down-asgard-up:

madamethursday:

[Image: A shoulders-up portrait of prosecutor Kym Worth, a beautiful, magnificent Black woman wearing a dark gray suit with a shit shirt and a white multi-tiered necklace, facing the camera.]

bankuei:

blackheartedlove:

aerialcircus:

Rapists, Beware: Detroit Prosecutor IDs 21 Attackers in ‘Rape Kit’ Investigation

“Kym Worthy has identified 21 serial rapists so far in a sweeping investigation that could have national implications. Abigail Pesta reports on the crusade to eliminate the rape-kit backlog.

Twenty-one serial rapists have been identified in a massive investigation led by Detroit prosecutor Kym Worthy—and her manhunt has only just begun.”

This is what I mean when I say it takes a society to keep fucked up shit rolling.   At the point when the police are sitting on 11,000 untested rape kits, with NO INTENTION of ever doing so, you basically are saying, “rape is a crime we’re not going to investigate”.

Y’ALL STAY ON GIVING SPEEDING TICKETS, BUT RAPE IS A CRIME YOU’RE NOT GOING TO INVESTIGATE.

The fact that in the first 150 kits, they’ve already found 21 serial rapists’ DNA.  Basically, a) no one investigates, b) no one prosecutes, c) no one cares.   We’ve got Homeland Security ready to swoop up and detain someone, indefinitely, if they said the wrong shit, but no one has time or money for rape victims.

Don’t ever let anyone say “the police aren’t all bad” because the article even lists SEVERAL CITIES that have backlogs like this, as well.   This isn’t a local outlier- this is a common problem, which means the whole policing system doesn’t fucking care.  And where are these good police out in checking their own departments and pushing to see this change?

can i just reblog this again for that spot-on commentary? YES.

— 2 years ago with 13495 notes

#rape  #inequality  #sexism  #police 
iandsharman:

glowtwins:

myadamantiumheart:

thinkerofmeanthoughts:

thisnoiseismusic:

Hi, there. I’m wearing a shirt that reads “Kill Me”. If you saw me at a party or on the street would you promptly murder me? What about if I had a few drinks? What if I was walking alone at night?I’m guessing that you wouldn’t if you’re a sane individual. The cops wouldn’t overlook your crime because of what I’m wearing because that’s silly. I wasn’t literally asking for you to kill me based on my choice of clothing. Who would take that defense seriously?
My friends wouldn’t blame me for being murdered and my killer would be behind bars almost instantly. So, why is it okay to rape someone because they’re wearing promiscuous clothes? Why does THEIR choice of clothing excuse THEIR attacker? It doesn’t. You’re silly if you think otherwise. The less guilt on the attacker. The more guilt on victim. Stop. Victim. Blaming.

Holy fuck. This guy gets it. 

Yep.

Damn Right.

Yup. Spot on. I hate the suggestion that there’s some mysterious amount of flesh which once displays causes a man to lose control of his ability to not rape someone. What I find particularly disturbing about that idea is that it implies that men are constantly fighting the urge to rape. That men are naturally and instinctively rapists and that women covering themselves up is the only thing that can possibly keep their urges under control. That is just plain bullshit…if you’re a man and you ever find yourself struggling with the urge to rape then you are mentally ill and you need to seek help.

iandsharman:

glowtwins:

myadamantiumheart:

thinkerofmeanthoughts:

thisnoiseismusic:

Hi, there.
I’m wearing a shirt that reads “Kill Me”.
If you saw me at a party or on the street would you promptly murder me?
What about if I had a few drinks? What if I was walking alone at night?
I’m guessing that you wouldn’t if you’re a sane individual.

The cops wouldn’t overlook your crime because of what I’m wearing because that’s silly. I wasn’t literally asking for you to kill me based on my choice of clothing. Who would take that defense seriously?

My friends wouldn’t blame me for being murdered and my killer would be behind bars almost instantly.

So, why is it okay to rape someone because they’re wearing promiscuous clothes? Why does THEIR choice of clothing excuse THEIR attacker?

It doesn’t. You’re silly if you think otherwise.
The less guilt on the attacker. The more guilt on victim.

Stop. Victim. Blaming.

Holy fuck. This guy gets it. 

Yep.

Damn Right.

Yup. Spot on. I hate the suggestion that there’s some mysterious amount of flesh which once displays causes a man to lose control of his ability to not rape someone. What I find particularly disturbing about that idea is that it implies that men are constantly fighting the urge to rape. That men are naturally and instinctively rapists and that women covering themselves up is the only thing that can possibly keep their urges under control. That is just plain bullshit…if you’re a man and you ever find yourself struggling with the urge to rape then you are mentally ill and you need to seek help.

(Source: , via comradeclaudia)

— 2 years ago with 359876 notes

#rape  #victim-blaming